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Viet Dao Dao de Beratón, Soria, Spain de Beratón, Soria, Spain

Lecteur Viet Dao Dao de Beratón, Soria, Spain

Viet Dao Dao de Beratón, Soria, Spain

mefc44

J'ai adoré le concept de l'histoire, mais il a perdu quelque chose en traduction.

mefc44

Read only if you want to torture yourself!

mefc44

(Review Contains Spoilers) Hmm...I have a rather mixed opinion of this book. The story started out slowly, and somewhat weakly as Alison is whisked away immediately to a mental institution. There, she meets a group of teenagers who suffer from a variety of issues, and a therapist who only wants to pry into her mind regarding the murder of a girl Alison isn't even sure she killed. There is little evidence, no body, and Alison isn't even sure she can trust her own memory. She remembers seeing Tori, the girl she is accused of murdering, disintegrate. How can that be logical? Since childhood, Alison has perceived the world very differently: with shapes, tastes, colors, textures, and sounds all blended together. I thought it was the author's unique descriptive imagery and writing style at first, but turns out it was a characteristic of Alison's neurologically-based condition (as later discovered in the story). The action starts to pick up when Alison meets with a self-proclaimed neurological researcher named Sebastian Faraday. He is a man in his mid-twenties, intelligent, and empathetic. Inevitably, a mutual affection grows between Allison and him. But more importantly, Faraday understands her and offers answers to her neurological phenomenon. This information could be the key to her innocence. After that, the entire story takes a sci-fi turn for the worse. Prepare yourself for a genre-flip, because I certainly wasn't expecting it. Ultraviolet goes from murder mystery with a disturbed teenager to wormholes and parallel dimensions in about five pages. Sebastian Faraday is actually an alien species who needs Alison's unusual talent to find his way back home. They are successful, and back on Faraday's home planet; they discover that Tori, also an alien species, is alive and well. From there, Alison and Tori set aside their differences and return home to Earth without Faraday due to technological complications. As much as I hate to admit, the transition to sci-fi was...awful. The entire ending was crammed into 30 pages with little explanation. I was left confused, unsatisfied, and disappointed. Additionally, Alison's neurological disorder went from relevant and informative, to completely exaggerated and unrealistic. After reading Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, R.J. Anderson's attempt at science fiction is dismal. Not to mention, most of her research regarding Synesthesia, Alison's disorder, came straight off a Wikipedia page. Overall, I enjoyed discovering about Synesthesia and I thought that the author portrayed the disorder professionally and vividly at first. It later grew to be completely unrealistic and repetitive. The main plot line of the story was too dragged out, and the awful genre-flip at the ending ruined the entire story for me. I think that the author ultimately tried to add depth to the story by creating unpredictable twists and turns, but it just wasn’t executed properly. Everything was brief, rushed, and exaggerated to a point of utter unrealism. I don't regret reading the book, but I highly don't recommend it. If the ending was logical and believable, I might have enjoyed the story, but unfortunately, aliens and wormholes just didn’t work out.