cuadradoal993f

Alex Cuadrado Aponte Cuadrado Aponte de Hindersön, Sweden de Hindersön, Sweden

Lecteur Alex Cuadrado Aponte Cuadrado Aponte de Hindersön, Sweden

Alex Cuadrado Aponte Cuadrado Aponte de Hindersön, Sweden

cuadradoal993f

La version Mists of Avalon de la fin de l'histoire ptolémique ...

cuadradoal993f

J'adore cette série! Cela m'a lié à tous ses livres. J'aime tout le livre, il n'y a jamais un moment ennuyeux et Briggs est formidable pour vous présenter ses personnages et son histoire, de sorte que vous ne voulez jamais abandonner la lecture de la série. Après avoir terminé son dernier installateur de la série Mercy Thompson, je peux dire cela en premier. Pom reste toujours l'un de mes favoris de tous les temps.

cuadradoal993f

I think self-sufficiency through farming is an achievable dream for some. Although I am a torpid cube-dweller now, I used to work on a farm, and I believe I have a fairly good perspective on the level of difficulty involved in becoming a farmer. Purely on the amount of physical effort required, I would say farming is, seasonally, an eight on a one-to-ten scale, where a puny office rat is a one and a fire jumper is a ten. (Make it a ten if you renounce tractors and insist on doing all the digging by hand). From a technical perspective, the skill level required for farming ranges widely. If burger flipper is a one and brain surgeon is a ten on the skill scale, you might be surprised how high a really excellent farmer rates. You can be a burger-and-fries farmer, in which case you will not be farming for long, or a brain-surgeon farmer, as is the case with John Seymour, the author of this book. His advice is based on wide experience and keen intelligence. Seymour is a witty, literate writer, and an obviously humane farmer who gives advice like: "keep a cock [rooster:] with your hens--they enjoy having it off as much as we do." How wise. After reading this book, you will have a clearer idea if the life is really for you. Although author makes some aspects of self-sufficient farming sound too easy (for instance, making it seem like all you need for pig butchering is a .22, a sharp knife and a gallon of home brew), the book is a detailed and accurate account of the basics of self-sufficient farm life. Organized by topic (Land--Horse--Cow--Dairy, etc.), it gives a run down of what is required to start from scratch. The book is illustrated with beautiful etchings, or perhaps wood-block prints. They go perfectly with the text. This is a book you will enjoy, even if you are not planning on becoming a farmer. If you are serious about self-sufficiency, this book will be the cornerstone of your reference library. Read up on John Seymour; he was an interesting fellow. He wrote many more books about self-sufficiency that you can find in your local library.