hacho_20112224

de Behram Khan Bugti, Pakistan de Behram Khan Bugti, Pakistan

Lecteur de Behram Khan Bugti, Pakistan

de Behram Khan Bugti, Pakistan

hacho_20112224

This was an audio book that I completed on my daily commute. First I will review the audio production: The voice acting was top notch, the characters were differentiated but not flamboyantly done. The pace seemed a bit slow at times, but there is a ponderous feel to much of the book so this was suitable. In places, when Raskolnikov's thought and emotions were particularly fevered the pace picked up marked giving a gripping, edge of your seat type of feeling. Now for the book: This is the second Dostoyevsky novel that I have consumed, and it was an incredible experience. Much of this novel is spent dealing with the philosophical nihilism of late 19th century Russia and you can see the seeds of the Bolshevik revolution and Soviet atheism playing out. Raskolnikov has an idea which is a play on Ivan Karamazov's thought that without God all things are lawful. He has determined that truly great men have no responsibility to follow the law, and indeed all great men leave a a trail of blood in their wake (Raskolnikov idolized Napoleon). The novel move through Raskolnikov's crime, his mental break down, and finally his redemption. It is a hefty novel, but well worth the time and effort. Dostoyevsky has a robust view of redemption that doesn't involve the saccharine sentimentality that you see in much writing of this sort.