boyan3dc129

Bojan Dimitrijevic Dimitrijevic de Kozierogi, Poland de Kozierogi, Poland

Lecteur Bojan Dimitrijevic Dimitrijevic de Kozierogi, Poland

Bojan Dimitrijevic Dimitrijevic de Kozierogi, Poland

boyan3dc129

Oh, so Norwegianly repressed. Not quite as good as Petterson's Out Stealing Horses (another 4-star in my ratings), but still a novel that brings out emotions even when the characters don't express any. The narrator is in the middle of a divorce and in the middle of his mother's imminent death. And he's a devoted Communist in 1989 - the year The Wall fell. His life is a mess. So he gets on a ferry and to try and find comfort with his semi-estranged mother, who is in Denmark, her birthplace -- the place where she belongs, but where her son doesn't. He can't find his place in the world, ideologically or within his relationships. What he does know is the city of Oslo, every tram line, every building, every station. There, he knows where he belongs in a physical world. But can a relationship with a city replace one with people? Searching for a connection, he discovers, mostly by himself, that it's not so easy to learn how to become a son again.